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Currently education in India is predominantly “classroom oriented” and lacks the real world exposure that is vital for holistic learning. Since agriculture plays a pivotal role in the Indian economy, global problems affect national agriculture in significant and complex ways. Therefore, agricultural students and professionals must be exposed to not only practical, but also experiential learning, in both agriculture and rural development sectors.

Updates

AIP Showcases its Mobile Solution in the 8th National Conference of KVKs in Bengaluru

October 24th, 2013 by
October 24, 2013 | Bengaluru
AIP’s e-learning and mobile solutions implementation team presented the transformative potential that its mobile solution (AIP Mobile) holds for extension professionals in improving farm productivity and farmers’ income. Presented during the 8th National Conference of KVKs in Bangalore on October 24 2013, the solution was appreciated by over five hundred KVK extension professionals who attended the session that was presided over by policy makers from ICAR, NAIP, Ministry of Agriculture and Govt of India, among others. There was an encouraging feedback from the stakeholders on adapting the tool.

About AIP Mobile

The hand-held solution will enable the extension workers to access information on various farmer intervention aspects like accessing complete agronomic information on farmers in the database; remote crop management (RCM) for timely technical assistance; good agricultural practices (GAP) demonstration through embedded videos in the field without the need for internet connectivity; and real-time field survey through the hand-held device.

Using the highly scalable solution with convenient offline capabilities, field level university extension staff can now conveniently access general information on the farmers in their target region; details of their land holding including field shape and size; micro-credit/insurance interventions; soil fertility information; crop Information including sowing, harvesting and inter-cropping; adoption and impact of crop varieties/hybrids developed by the universities; current agronomic practices; pest/disease information; training, demonstration and intervention history and much more.

The field survey application is one of the most convenient tools that will enable the extension executive to follow the field boundaries to automatically capture the size, shape and geo-coordinates of the plot for direct upload to a central database when wireless connectivity is available or it can be saved and uploaded from the extension office later.

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AIP Imparts Training to Farmers on New Modalities in Horticulture

September 22nd, 2013 by
Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activity- Phase III
September 21-22, 2013 | Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh

An emerging economy like India faces the key challenge of finding out an effective method to enhance institutional capacity building and bolstering new technologies to reach out to the farmers and improving the productivity and quality of agriculture. As part of its capacity building initiatives, AIP has been taking such initiatives since its inception in 2011.

In yet another such developmental initiative, under its “Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activities”, AIP conducted a two-day training program on September 21-22, 2013 on vegetables and flower production technology at Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Barkachha, Mirzapur. It was facilitated by the Institute of Agricultural Sciences (IAS), Banaras Hindu University (BHU).

The participants of the training program included Prof. Ravi Pratap Singh, Director, IAS as chief guest; Prof. Arun K. Singh, Head, Dept. of Extension Education, IAS; Prof. Anil K. Singh, Head, Dept. of Horticulture; Dr. A. K. Pal, Dept. of Horticulture; Dr. O. P. Mishra, Dept. of Extension Education; Dr. Shriram Singh, Prof. S. P. Singh, Dr. S. K. Goyal, Dr. S. N. Singh and Dr. J. P. Rai, RGSC, Barkachha; Shri Bhupendra Singh, TATA Chemicals Ltd.; Vipram Chourasia, STA, IAS; Dr. Ramesh Singh, Project Worker; Mr. Abhishek Pratap Singh, Neha Upreti, Swati Pahuja and Sneha Singh, Research Scholars, Dept. of Extension Education, IAS and undergraduate agriculture students from RGSC, Barkachha and a large number of farmers from Mirzapur District.

The program imparted training to farmers on harnessing technology to improve productivity and quality of crops. Sessions on the importance of soil testing and micronutrient application were taken by S. N. Singh. Vital information on essential nutrients for vegetables and other crops were shared by S. P. Singh and Bhupendra Singh. Various agro products of TATA chemicals and basic problems of paddy cultivation were also discussed during the program.

Basic knowledge on flower production, especially Gladiolus and Marigold, post-harvest management and production technology of vegetables and flowers, weed management were some of the topics discussed by the experts during the workshop.


View Details of TDIIA, Phase-I

View Details of TDIIA, Phase-II

The Assamese Thali to be enriched by the Delicacy of Fish and Meat Pickle

August 26th, 2013 by
August 26, 2013 | Jorhat, Assam
The traditional meals of the Assamese generally comprise fish or meat-based items, which also form important sources of proteins for the populace. Though more popular as freshly cooked food, the processed forms of both fish and meat (like pickles) are equally nutritious, yet not available as commercial products in the market. Results of several surveys conducted on the popularity of meat and fish pickle indicate a potential market among the rural and urban population. To address this gap the Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) enabled a women’s self help group adopt the technology of preparing meat and fish pickle from Assam Agricultural University (AAU). This first step into the niche market will help the organization consider new avenues to tap into the opportunity of commercializing novel processed food products in the near future. In addition to adding to the variety of the Assamese plate, these products will ease people’s access to cooked meat and fish, sans the trouble of cooking. The transfer of technology took place between AAU and Meghalee Food Products in Jorhat on 23 August, 2013.

This was followed by an intense two-day training on product development and manufacturing at the facilities of Maghalee covering aspects like recipe, production process, hygiene, quality control, ingredient specification, regulatory aspects, food safety measures, labeling, pricing and product distribution strategy. A pilot batch of both chicken and fish pickle were prepared under the guidance of the developers.

The recipe of the meat pickle was developed by Prof. Mineswar Hazarika while that of the fish was developed by Prof. Pran Jyoti Sharma and his team (Prof Jiten Sharma and Prof Sarifuddin Ahmed), all hailing from AAU. After thorough research on the quality, palatability and durability of the products, the prototypes of the pickles were developed with financial support from AIP. These prototypes were used for internal testing to judge the suitability of the product and showcasing to small scale entrepreneurs and encouraging them to take them up for commercialization. Maghalee, which is among the emerging enterprises in the region, was identified as the potential player to whom the technology could be transferred and later commercialized.

Speaking on the occasion, Prof Hazarika and Prof Sharma said, “The success of a product doesn’t just lie in its production, but how it matriculates into people’s lives. AIP has helped us reach out to the entrepreneurs as well as the consumers and has offered us a platform to materialize our ideas. The commercialization of chicken and fish pickle through Maghalee will enrich the variety and palatability of the Assamese cuisine. The process of commercialization has also created strong bonds with the entrepreneurs and in the process helped us touch several lives around us.”

Adding to the statement, Mrs Meghalee Bora, proprietor of Meghalee Food Products said, “Introducing innovative products in the market is the key to ensure our position as a market leader. Initial survey conducted for chicken and fish pickle developed by Assam Agricultural University and transferred to us through AIP indicated good market potential of these products. We will use our reach to popularize these in the entire northeastern region for a positive economic and societal impact.”

This process has set the precedence for many more such university and industry partnerships in future and has motivated many researchers to develop high potential products and inspired small scale entrepreneurs to come forward and take up these products to improve their income and profitability.

AIP Imparts Training to Mango Cultivators to Expand Export Market

August 23rd, 2013 by

August 13, 2013 | Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh

India produces nearly 50% of the world’s mangoes and Uttar Pradesh is known to be one of the largest mango producing states in India. There are more than 30 varieties of mangoes grown commercially and one such popular variety is Chausa mango. This variety is large in size, light yellow and pulpy and is cultivated for the purpose of exporting to countries like Japan, USA, Europe and the Middle East.

In the recent past, mango cultivation and production has declined considerably. Some of the major issues faced by the cultivators are limited resource availability, lack of modern irrigation methods, branding techniques, basic infrastructure for cold storage, etc. The absence of processing/packaging-based interventions lead to heavy losses for the farmers. In order to boost mango cultivation and minimize such losses, the Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) in collaboration with All India Food Processors’ Association (AIFPA) and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) conducted a seminar cum training program titled “Chausa Mango Processing & Export Opportunities from Uttar Pradesh” on August 13, 2013 at Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh. The objective of the program was to train mango cultivators on ways to boost the production of export quality mangoes.

The program was attended by almost 100 mango growers and processors from the region, government officials and researchers, technical experts and policy makers. Other prominent experts comprised Mr. Shazan Masood, EX-MP & Chief Guest; Mr. Pradeep, Member of Parliament; Dr. R. P. Singh, Joint Director, HETC; Dr. R. M. Mathur, Director, Central Pulp and Paper Research Institute, Sahranpur; Dr. Nileema Garg, Post Harvest Expert, Central Institute of Subtropical Horticulture, Lucknow; Mr. Vinod Kaul, DGM, APEDA; Mr. Ashok Jha, General Manager, Sathguru Management Consultants; Dr. Kalyan Goswami, Secretary General, AIFPA; Dr. A. K. Paul, Horticulture and Dr. R. K. Pradhan, Dept. of Farm Engineering from Banaras Hindu University.

The participants were given an overview of the importance of the international market and the growing demand for mangoes. Exclusive topics on production techniques; pre-harvest & post harvest management; nutrient management; disease and canopy management; quality standards and certifications management; value addition and equipment needs for processing were covered by experts during the technical sessions.

Mr. Pradeep emphasized on the importance of improved infrastructure facility like roads and electricity for rapid transport, improved cold storage facilities with controlled temperature for longer shelf life, packaging and quality control systems, etc. for farmers to keep pace with the growing demands of the international market.

The sessions helped the participants gain insights into cultivation and product development. A positive feedback and motivation revealed the success of the workshop.

AIP Reinforces the Dying Jute Industry in Assam

July 6th, 2013 by
July 6, 2013 | Dhubri, Assam
Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activity- Phase III

Assam is the second largest producer of jute in the country. Despite being one of the largest producers, the small scale industries and jute farmers are striving to get a decent price for their production.

To shore up the dying jute industry and make farmers’ lives more stable, AIP under its Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activity (TDIIA) organized an awareness workshop titled “Commercialization of Jute Cultivation” on July 6, 2013 at Pratima Pande Baruah Auditorium, Bilasipara, Assam. The Directorate of Extension Education, Assam Agricultural University (AAU) and Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Dhubri, under AIP’s guidance sensitized the farmers on ways of improving jute cultivation and improving their income.

The program was attended by jute cultivators and marginal farmers from nearby districts, agricultural experts, faculty and students from AAU. H. C. Bhattacharyya, Director of Extension Education, AAU, inaugurated the training handout published by the Directorate. Published in the vernacular, the handouts were distributed among the farmers for reference and future use. Bhattacharyya delivered a lecture on ways to improve the quality of jute fiber. S. Talukdar, Sub Divisional Agricultural Officer, Bilasipara highlighted the importance of jute cultivation in Dhubri district. He stressed on practicing advanced farming methods and government oriented schemes to enhance the yield.

C. K. Sarma, Program Coordinator, KVK, Dhubri discussed the significance of soil and climate to grow quality jute fiber. He stressed on the importance of using improved variety of seeds and adopting scientific techniques to obtain quality fiber. Tips on jute cultivation that include soil preparation, proper sowing and application of fertilizer, retting, etc were shared with all the participants. Sarma also discussed different strains of bacteria isolated by scientists at AAU for proper retting of jute.

Another lecture on “Scientific Cultivation of Jute” informed farmers on using the right techniques to improve production, which include checking soil and climatic conditions before sowing, improving land tilling techniques using modern technologies, etc for a healthy crop. B. C. Deka (Plant Nematology), KVK, Dhubri spoke on “Integrated Crop Management Techniques”. She discussed various crop diseases, their symptoms and ways of preventing them through pest control and technology. Toslima Sultana Begum, SMS (Home Sc), KVK, Barpeta, AAU discussed the various procedures to prepare different jute items and ways of improving their shelf-life.

Towards the end of the session, the farmers interacted with the experts and shared their concerns. They were happy to be a part of the workshop and said that the learning that they received will provide them the right guidance and motivation to enhance their produce.


 View Details of TDIIA Phase- II

View Details of TDIIA Phase- I

AIP Organizes Kisan Mela to Connect with Resource-constrained Farmers

April 4th, 2013 by
April 3-4, 2013 | Varanasi

In the course of over half a century, Indian farming has transformed from an occupation largely dependent on traditional practices to one supported by modern technology. Indian agricultural universities are a major part of this planned development aimed at delivering technologies conceived in research laboratories at the doorstep of the farmers, empowering them with knowledge and fostering growth. The Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) has been a partner in this venture, supporting and enabling several agricultural universities in empowering farmers, largely through customized training and outreach programs.

In yet another significant step, AIP organized a farmer fair (kisan mela) in association with Banaras Hindu University (BHU) to disseminate information on improved crop production techniques using technology. The two-day program, conducted on 3-4 April 2013 in Varanasi, witnessed several stalls manned by students, experts and agriculturists from across the state of Uttar Pradesh providing useful information on agriculture and crop management to the farmers.

Attended by over 60 farmers from nearby villages, along with students, faculty and experts, the program shared information on hi-yielding seeds, latest technologies in agriculture, crop protection & yield enhancement techniques, fertilizer and pesticide use, natural resource optimization models, improved pest management techniques, etc. Targeting resource-constrained farmers, the students and agriculturists displayed several efficient agricultural and farming models on ways of lowering their costs and gaining a second income stream to lead happier and prosperous lives and eventually expand their operations.

Several resource-constrained farmers and disadvantaged producers interested in enhancing their incomes were helped by AIP with new ideas to ensure a motivated generation of farmers that will foster a strong agricultural sector to drive Indian economy and provide people with a secure and affordable food supply.

Dr. P. S. Naik, Director, Indian Institute of Vegetable Research, Varanasi was the chief guest for the program. Other eminent members at the program included Prof. Ravi Pratap Singh, Director, Institute of Agriculture Sciences (IAS), BHU; Prof. Arun Kumar Singh, IAS, BHU; Dr. Suresh D, Program Coordinator, Sathguru Management Consultants; Prof. Subedar Singh, Dean, Faculty of Agriculture, BHU and Prof. Harikesh Bahadur Singh, Dept. of Mycology and Plant Pathology, BHU.

Along with other dignitaries and faculty members, Dr. Naik surveyed each stall set up by students and agriculturists. There were several lectures followed by discussions with farmers on livelihood enhancement and improved crop production techniques.




Building Capacity to Ensure Effective Natural Resource Management

March 12th, 2013 by
Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activities, Phase-IV
March 12, 2013 | Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh
Among its several initiatives to alleviate poverty among the rural populace in the Indo-Gangetic Plains, the Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activities (TDIIA) are one of the tools that the Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) has adopted to improve the productivity of the Indian farmers by introducing new farming techniques.

TDIIA aims to improve the yield, income and livelihood of the resource-constrained farmers in the Indo-Gangetic Plains by imparting training and helping them to optimally use the available natural resources. Towards this end, in alliance with Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK), Hastinapur; Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology (SVPUA&T) and Tata Chemicals Limited (TCL), AIP conducted a one-day training program for farmers, which involved students, faculty, staff and agricultural experts from KVK, Hastinapur and KVK, Baghra; SVPUA&T and TCL.

After the successful completion of Phase I, II & III of TDIIA in various districts of Uttar Pradesh last year, this year the program successfully completed phase IV on 12 March 2013 at Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh. TDIIA trained the farmers on enhancing sugarcane production. More than 100 farmers from Hastinapur and its surrounding areas; KVK officials; 20 officials from TCL; Mawana and Tikola Sugar Mill officials and 8 final year students from SVPUA&T attended the program. Since it focused on enhancing sugarcane production, the participation of sugar mill officials in the program helped the farmers gain crucial insights into the critical aspects related to post-harvest techniques. This included aspects related to minimizing loss during storage, management and transportation.

The training started at 10:30 am in the training hall, KVK, Hastinapur. Dr. Omveer Singh, the Coordinator of the program welcomed the participants and Prof. Ashok Kumar, Dept. of Soil Science, SVPUA&T, Meerut briefed the participants on the significance of the program as well as the critical role that the sugarcane crop plays in supporting thousands of families in Uttar Pradesh. After the brief thematic introduction, the farmers were handed over questionnaires for filling in pre-training information on the current knowledge that they possessed on sugarcane. Ms. Sang Lee, USAID Agreement Officer Representative, interacted with representatives from TCL, Tikola and Mawana sugar mills and KVK scientists and took stock of the constraints and issues faced by the sugarcane farmers as well as the extension workers who actively work with the farmers in their fields.

During the course of the program, the sugarcane farmers were imparted training through several presentations and discussions on enhancing sugarcane production using simple natural resource management techniques. The farmers were also trained on better, more effective approaches on sowing, choosing and planting better crop varieties, fertilizer dosage, and their effective modes of application, efficient pest control mechanisms, effective storage and transportation of crop. Dr. R. C. Verma, SMS, Plant Protection, KVK, Baghra discussed integrated pest management, a broad based approach to control insects and pests while underlining several techniques to prevent major diseases in sugarcane. Mr A. L. Yadav, Scientist, TCL briefed the participants on PARAS formula, a crop- and region-specific customized fertilizer that provides balanced crop nutrition to the soil, boosts the productivity of crops and improves the overall quality of the yield. The experts discussed how inadequate and indiscriminate use of fertilizers harms the soil. Inappropriate and inefficient use of organic fertilizers has damaged the soil. Over time, the uncalculated use of fertilizers leads to a nutrient imbalance, which threatens crop productivity and soil health, especially in the absence of the practice to replenish the lost micro-nutrients in the soil. An interactive session to deal with the issues that farmers face in enhancing crop production and management during the crop life cycle, was held between the agricultural experts and the farmers. The interactive session was a witness to several critical queries and concerns raised by the farmers to share their experiences and constraints while cultivating sugarcane. The program concluded with a vote of thanks by Dr. Omveer Singh.


View Details of TDIIA, Phase-III

View Details of TDIIA, Phase-II

View Details of TDIIA, Phase-I

Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activities (TDIIA) Phase-II

March 12th, 2013 by
March 12, 2013 | Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh
Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activity- Phase II
Among its several initiatives to alleviate poverty among the rural populace in the Indo-Gangetic Plains, the Technology Dissemination and Income Improvement Activities (TDIIA) are one of the tools that the Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) has adopted to improve the productivity of the Indian farmers by introducing new farming techniques.

TDIIA aims to improve the yield, income and livelihood of the resource-constrained farmers in the Indo-Gangetic Plains by imparting training and helping them to ally-optimally use the available natural resources. Towards this end, in alliance with Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK), Hastinapur; Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology (SVPUA&T) and Tata Chemicals Limited (TCL), AIP conducted a one-day training program for farmers, which involved students, faculty, staff and agricultural experts from KVK, Hastinapur and KVK, Baghra; SVPUA&T and TCL.

After the successful completion of Phase I, II & III of TDIIA in various districts of Uttar Pradesh last year, this year the program successfully completed phase IV on 12 March 2013 at Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh. The farmers were trained on enhancing the production of sugarcane. More than 100 farmers from Hastinapur and its surrounding areas; KVK officials; 20 officials from TCL; Mawana and Tikola Sugar Mill officials and 8 final year students attended the program. Since the program focused on enhancing sugarcane production, the participation of sugar mill officials in the program helped the farmers gain crucial insights into the critical aspects related to post-harvest techniques. This included aspects related to minimizing loss during storage, management and transportation.

Dr. Omveer Singh, the Coordinator of the program welcomed the participants and Prof. Ashok Kumar, Dept. of Soil Science, SVPUA&T, Meerut briefed the participants on the significance of the program as well as the critical role that the sugarcane crop plays in supporting thousands of families in Uttar Pradesh. After the brief thematic introduction, the farmers were handed over questionnaires for filling- in pre-training information on the current knowledge that they possessed on sugarcane. Ms. Sang Lee, USAID Agreement Officer Representative, interacted with representatives from TCL, Tikola and Mawana sugar mills and KVK scientists and took stock of the constraints and issues faced by the sugarcane farmers as well as the extension workers who actively work with the farmers in their fields.

During the course of the program, the sugarcane farmers were imparted technical education training through several presentations and discussions on enhancing sugarcane production using simple natural resource management techniques. The farmers were also trained on better, more effective approaches on sowing, choosing and planting better crop varieties, fertilizer dosage, etc. Dr. R. C. Verma, SMS, Plant Protection, KVK, Baghra discussed integrated pest management, a broad based approach to control insects and pests, while underlining several techniques to prevent major diseases in sugarcane. Mr. A. L. Yadav, Scientist, TCL briefed the participants on PARAS formula, an innovative crop-and region-specific customized fertilizer brought by Tata, useful in enhancing production. The experts discussed how inadequate and indiscriminate use of fertilizers harms the soil. An interactive session, aimed at dealing with the issues that farmers face in enhancing crop production and management during the crop life cycle, was held between the agricultural experts and the farmers. The session was a witness to several critical queries and concerns raised by the farmers to share their experiences and constraints while cultivating sugarcane.


View Details of TDIIA, Phase-I

International Agriculture & Rural Development 2012 — a Re-enforcing Platform for Indian and US Students in Experiential Learning

January 16th, 2013 by
January 4—16, 2013 | India
To provide exposure to experiential learning and build capacity among the students, the Agricultural Innovation Partnership sponsored several students and faculty members from the Indian and US universities to take part in the International Agriculture & Rural Development (IARD) program 2013. The IARD program offered opportunities for students to enhance their knowledge base and learning through global peer interaction as well as helped faculty develop new learning modules for effective experiential learning.

Held from January 4 to 16, 2013, this year the program saw an unprecedented participation from universities in India and US. A total of 75 students and faculty began their sojourn through towns and cities in Maharashtra as they visited rural development initiatives, farms and agri-business firms over a two-week period. The universities that participated in the program included Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi; Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture & Technology, Meerut; Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat; Central Agricultural University, Imphal; Bihar Agricultural University, Sabour; Cornell University, Ithaca; Tuskegee University, Alabama; University of Georgia, Athens and University of California, Davis.

The visiting team had exposure in three thematic areas—Agricultural Systems (AS), Rural Infrastructure (RI) and Value Addition (VA). This not only helped participants gain in depth knowledge, but also get a first hand and direct experience with field visits to research institutes, NGOs, agricultural universities as well as attend lectures on rural development shared by experienced speakers. At the end of the twelve-day India field trip, students submitted a project report. Sharing his view on the program, K. V. Raman, Professor, Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics, CALS, Cornell University, said, “To implement this course we had to overcome many challenges and evolve a quality program that included all the teaching components that would make the course into an academically rich and rewarding experience for all students and faculty involved.”

The initiative has widened the vision of several hundred students over the last several years. The tremendous coordination and knowledge contribution from Cornell and Sathguru had facilitated the initiative over the years with innovative improvements every subsequent year.

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York established the International Agriculture & Rural Development program (IARD) program in 1968 with Puerto Rico as its maiden destination. However, from 2003, India became the chosen location for the field study component. Since then Sathguru Management Consultants, in partnership with CALS, has built upon the potential of the program by involving students and faculty from Indian agricultural universities and institutes. The unique initiative thus became a platform for Indian students of agriculture and related sciences learn from an international faculty and share their knowledge with their peers from other nations.

Here’s what some of the students had to say about the visits at the end of the program.

After returning back to the states, I’ve found it difficult to adjust back to normal life. It could be the jet lag, the snow on the ground, or any other variety of factors, but I find myself strangely nostalgic for an opportunity to go back to India. I recently watched the “In the Footsteps of Mahatma Gandhi” video that was given to me at BAIF by Dr. Negde and can’t wait for another opportunity to experience, and hopefully contribute to, the rural development of India through sustainable agriculture.” – Catherine May, Cornell University

 “A non-profit eye institute run by Mahyco Research Foundation. I think the best way to serve people is to help them with their sight. The Project Dekho is absolutely commendable, in which they are picking up the villagers from their home, treating them with the world class facilities and then dropping them back with proper medications. Attending more than 400 patients a day and setting up an ophthalmic camp in every three months is an exceptionally great job.” – Aditi Sharma, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture & Technology

Innovation in Food Processing: SVPUA&T Promotes Entrepreneurship through Value-Addition

December 24th, 2012 by
December 22-24 | Meerut, India
In order to improve shelf life, taste and nutritional value of value-added food items using traditional as well as modern methods, the Agricultural Innovation Partnership (AIP) organized a three-day training program for fruit and vegetable producers at the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Food Technology, College of Agriculture, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture & Technology from December 22-24, 2012.The program focused on imparting training to small-scale producers, farmers, entrepreneurs and homemakers on using simple, but effective ways of employing the recent advances made in processing and preservation technologies in fruits and vegetables. The program instilled among the participants ideas for adding value to local agricultural produce using modern techniques to produce fruit- and vegetable-based beverages; ready-to-serves; preparing squash and nectar, jam and jelly, ketchup, sauce, etc. The training helped the participants gain exposure in starting their own businesses, produce safe and nutritious value-added products and promote entrepreneurship.

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